Official Luthiers Forum!

Solely owned and operated by Lance Kragenbrink
It is currently Mon Nov 20, 2017 4:15 am


All times are UTC - 5 hours


Forum rules


Be nice, no cussin and enjoy!




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 42 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2017 7:49 pm 
Offline
Contributing Member
Contributing Member

Joined: Sun Feb 17, 2013 4:58 pm
Posts: 595
First name: Ed
Last Name: Minch
City: Chestertown
State: MD
Zip/Postal Code: 21620
Country: United States
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
Just an amateur here - make a couple a year. I realized that it would not be much more difficult to make a negative 16" radius sanding block than it would be to make a positive 16" radius fretboard. So I did. I sanded the first one start-to-finish, but since then I have planed 90% of the material away, then sanded the last bit.

Here are a couple of shots - it was made from the same piece of 30 year old cherry as the fretboard I am sanding:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/ruby1638/16750685944/in/album-72157649776959267/

Still learning

Ed


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Sep 04, 2017 7:09 am 
Offline
Contributing Member
Contributing Member
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 26, 2005 5:49 pm
Posts: 2903
Location: Norway
The hand plane method is pretty quick, so unless you really enjoy making and using jigs, or you plan to go into production, I encourage everyone to try it. I'm not a hand tool fundamentalist by any stretch, there is just not much time to save here.

My procedure is: Resawing (unless I use a FB blank) - thickness sanding (home made drum sander) - slotting (table saw jig) - profiling (template routing or saw+plane) - radiusing (hand plane) - inlays (if any) - sanding (plane body sanding block) - fretting (arbour press).

_________________
Rian Gitar og Mandolin



These users thanked the author Arnt Rian for the post: Bryan Bear (Fri Sep 08, 2017 2:59 pm)
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Sep 04, 2017 5:11 pm 
Offline
Koa
Koa
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2008 5:08 am
Posts: 1346
Location: Raleigh, NC
First name: Steve
Last Name: Sollod
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
I got my hands on the McClary jig and went ahead and made one. Can't wait to try it out. Its gotta be better than what I've been doing. Thanks for the replies to my post!


You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

_________________
Steve Sollod (pronounced sorta like "Solid")
www.swiftcreekguitars.com



These users thanked the author sdsollod for the post: Marty M. (Fri Oct 06, 2017 6:12 pm)
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Sep 04, 2017 5:13 pm 
Offline
Contributing Member
Contributing Member
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jul 10, 2009 4:44 am
Posts: 3175
First name: colin
Last Name: north
Country: Scotland.
Focus: Build
Status: Semi-pro
[:Y:]

_________________
“There are two men inside the artist, the poet and the craftsman. One is born a poet. One becomes a craftsman.” - Emile Zola


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Sep 04, 2017 5:47 pm 
Offline
Cocobolo
Cocobolo

Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 12:15 pm
Posts: 398
Location: Santa Barbara, Ca
First name: John "jd"
City: Santa Barbara
State: Ca
Focus: Build
Status: Semi-pro
Barry Daniels wrote:
A file or even a rasp is simply the wrong tool for the job.


The right tool is a plane. Sand 16" on one end and 20 on the other as a guide, then use a trusty #7 to shape the rest. Works great and likely takes less time then setting up one of those noisy router jigs..

-jd


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Sep 04, 2017 8:31 pm 
Offline
Brazilian Rosewood
Brazilian Rosewood

Joined: Fri Dec 14, 2007 3:21 pm
Posts: 2443
Location: Alexandria MN
With that McClary jig a couple of tips. A rounded edge "dish carving" router bit works well. I have this one.

https://www.amazon.com/Freud-99-026-4-I ... router+bit

Also when setting up slide the carriage to each side at each end of the board and make sure the clearance at the edges is equal. If not you can shim the carriage with tape.

Start in the center just grazing the board and do climb cuts only to avoid chip out. With the above bit chip out is pretty uncommon but occasionally you do get some minor stuff along the fret slots.

You can rig up a dust collection gizmo with a shop vac that gets probably 60% of the debris but it's better than nothing. Positive stops for the carriage at each end are nice.


Image

It is noisy and violent but I have been using the jig for 12 years and it works and leaves quite a smooth finish.

I have been putting off trying a plane because I can set this thing up in a couple of minutes and do a board in 10". I do plan to try my hand at planing a board after reading the posts

_________________
It's not what you don't know that hurts you, it's what you do know that's wrong.



These users thanked the author Terence Kennedy for the post: Marty M. (Fri Oct 06, 2017 6:13 pm)
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 10:01 am 
Offline
Contributing Member
Contributing Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 08, 2008 11:36 am
Posts: 5138
Location: Southeast US
City: Lenoir City
State: TN
Zip/Postal Code: 37772
Country: US
Focus: Build
A very sharp hand plane here too. I make some initial passes to get the bulk waste off then I chalk the board and use a radius block with sandpaper to mark the high spots. Lets me get real close before I go to the radius block to finalize. After the fret board is on the neck and guitar I level with a beam then fret.

_________________
Steve Smith
"Music is what feelings sound like"


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 11:28 am 
Offline
Koa
Koa

Joined: Fri Aug 19, 2005 4:02 am
Posts: 1701
Location: United States
I used to make a lot of fingerboards for archtops that had large MOP block inlays. I used a similar router jig with a planer/dado bit that had a negative rake angle. Never had any chip out, even on the MOP. I used a diamond hone to make a slight radius on the outside corner of the bit which helped prevent scoring.

http://www.cmtutensili.com/show_items.asp?pars=RB~852B~2



These users thanked the author Barry Daniels for the post: pat macaluso (Wed Sep 06, 2017 3:08 am)
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 1:40 pm 
Offline
Brazilian Rosewood
Brazilian Rosewood
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2011 6:08 pm
Posts: 2438
First name: ernest
Last Name: kleinman
City: lee's summit
State: mo
Zip/Postal Code: 64081
Country: usa
Focus: Build
Status: Professional
Michael I trash picked some of that europly from a neighbour.It/s called flexa LIT from paris , meaning flex bed there are 7 plies in a 8 mm thickness , will use it for jigs. Your right , t is better quality than BB thanks for the tip



These users thanked the author ernie for the post: Michaeldc (Fri Sep 08, 2017 5:45 pm)
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 6:34 pm 
Offline
Contributing Member
Contributing Member
User avatar

Joined: Fri May 18, 2012 8:35 pm
Posts: 2294
Location: Austin, Texas
First name: Dan
Last Name: Smith
City: Round Rock
State: TX
Zip/Postal Code: 78681
Country: USA
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
A local buddy glued one of them wooden radius blocks to the bottom of an old electric sander.
That feller is a genius.
I use the SM aluminum block. Maple takes about 30 minutes, Ebony takes all day.

_________________
wah
Wah-wah-wah-wah
Wah


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 10, 2017 9:54 pm 
Offline
Contributing Member
Contributing Member
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 31, 2009 8:50 pm
Posts: 1236
Location: Seattle WA
Focus: Build
Status: Semi-pro
dzsmith wrote:
A local buddy glued one of them wooden radius blocks to the bottom of an old electric sander.
That feller is a genius.
How did that work for him? Seems like those sanders have a circular vibrating pattern. Festool has one that goes back and forth in a linear pattern that I thought might work. But quite $pendy.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2017 10:09 am 
Offline
Koa
Koa

Joined: Sat May 19, 2007 11:03 am
Posts: 1737
Location: Litchfield MI
Focus: Build
Status: Professional
An in-line pneumatic auto body repair file might work with the radius block idea since the action is not orbital.

_________________
Ken Cierp

http://www.kennethmichaelguitars.com/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2017 11:14 am 
Offline
Koa
Koa

Joined: Fri Aug 19, 2005 4:02 am
Posts: 1701
Location: United States
I use a home made 24" MDF caul attached to a manual auto body file that provides a bit of adjustment capability.


You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:06 pm 
Offline
Contributing Member
Contributing Member
User avatar

Joined: Fri May 18, 2012 8:35 pm
Posts: 2294
Location: Austin, Texas
First name: Dan
Last Name: Smith
City: Round Rock
State: TX
Zip/Postal Code: 78681
Country: USA
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
kencierp wrote:
An in-line pneumatic auto body repair file might work with the radius block idea since the action is not orbital.

Yes, I checked, and he did use an air tool made for automotive work.

_________________
wah
Wah-wah-wah-wah
Wah


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:32 pm 
Offline
Cocobolo
Cocobolo

Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2008 1:40 pm
Posts: 429
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
First name: Roger
State: Oklahoma
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
When I first started, I was hand sanding as well, and there weren't words strong enough to describe how much I hated it. From there, I built Marty's jig and used it for a long time. It's pretty much the best of the router methods. I finally scored an edge sander and bought the Grizzly fretboard sanding apparatus, and it's the easiest.

The Grizzly apparatus didn't fit my sander, so I simply mounted it to the wall, which actually works out much better because I can use my sander as a fretboard radius tool or an edge sander without having to mess around with removing the jig. It's much more convenient.

Image

Image



These users thanked the author RogerC108 for the post (total 2): Marty M. (Fri Oct 06, 2017 6:14 pm) • pat macaluso (Mon Sep 11, 2017 7:10 pm)
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2017 6:27 pm 
Offline
Mahogany
Mahogany

Joined: Fri Mar 31, 2006 9:42 pm
Posts: 72
Location: United States
Glad to see some of you using my router radius jig design. I redid one for a Harbor Freight trim router. It's pictured on TDPRI if you want to see it. While not as robust as the original, it does the trick and takes up a little less space. I bought an extra long 1/4 shank straight bit for it. Don't bother with the melamine covered MDF though, the double sided tape is stronger than the melamine adhesive.


You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Oct 07, 2017 8:56 am 
Offline
Brazilian Rosewood
Brazilian Rosewood

Joined: Sun Mar 30, 2008 8:20 am
Posts: 2155
"A file or even a rasp is simply the wrong tool for the job."

Although it would not be my first choice to radius a new board, I have used laminate files to fix humps and hollows in old boards. In the right hands (experienced machinist or such) I'm sure it could be used to rough out a radius on a new board - but there are better methods.


"You can rig up a dust collection gizmo with a shop vac that gets probably 60% of the debris but it's better than nothing"

Hi Terrence,
I like the dust collection addition. I wonder if adding dust brushes to the open sides of the jig, like some CNC's have would pick up another 20% of the dust.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 42 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Clinchriver and 6 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
phpBB customization services by 2by2host.com