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 Post subject: Little seen cutaway
PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 11:51 am 
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First name: Ed
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Do these work as a cutaway?

The bottom picture is of a new-this-year Taylor offering called a bevelled cutaway.


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 Post subject: Re: Little seen cutaway
PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 1:18 pm 
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I have never played the first style, but the taylor is pretty nice and should feel great to play !!!

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 Post subject: Re: Little seen cutaway
PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 1:29 pm 
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Aren't those frets way up there just for show? ;)


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 Post subject: Re: Little seen cutaway
PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 3:00 pm 
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I figured I'd give a scoop cutaway a try on a Modified dreadnaught I built a couple years ago. I found playing it to be somewhat restrictive compared to a more standard cutaway and haven't done a second yet. I do like the way they look! I didn't get a chance to take proper pics before it was out the door...

I stole the idea from our own Pat Foster. http://www.patfosterguitars.com/opus/large-60.html

Cheers


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 Post subject: Re: Little seen cutaway
PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 3:36 pm 
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The scoop cutaway works great on ukuleles, but for the strumming hand not the fretting hand.

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These users thanked the author johnparchem for the post: Pmaj7 (Sun Oct 07, 2018 1:29 am)
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 Post subject: Re: Little seen cutaway
PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 3:41 pm 
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That kind of cutaway does look really good, but functionally is kind of pointless IMO. The main benefit of a cutaway for me is that I have more space before the side of my hand hits the shoulder of the guitar. As soon as that happens, I have to start rotating my hand to reach the higher frets, and can't play normal chord shapes anymore. These scoop cutaways give you a straighter line to reach for the high frets, but you still have to rotate your hand.


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 Post subject: Re: Little seen cutaway
PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 4:29 pm 
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A lot depends on your technique. Classical players, or folks who use the 'thumb behind' technique, find the bevel cutaway useful, but if you play with the thumb over the bass side of the neck as many steel string players do, it's not so good.

I feel the pointy bevel cut looks a bit 'unfinished'. I worked out a way to soften the point and recurve the cut so that it blends in with the binding. It's a bit trickier to make, but IMO looks nicer. Here's a shot of one on a Classical I made a while back in bee's wing Morado and WRC with Macassar binding.
Attachment:
closecut-s.jpg


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These users thanked the author Alan Carruth for the post (total 5): Durero (Mon Oct 08, 2018 10:55 pm) • Doc (Sun Oct 07, 2018 9:44 am) • Robbie_McD (Sun Oct 07, 2018 8:54 am) • Clay S. (Sat Oct 06, 2018 10:56 pm) • Bryan Bear (Sat Oct 06, 2018 10:32 pm)
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 Post subject: Re: Little seen cutaway
PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 6:16 pm 
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DennisK wrote:
That kind of cutaway does look really good, but functionally is kind of pointless IMO. The main benefit of a cutaway for me is that I have more space before the side of my hand hits the shoulder of the guitar. As soon as that happens, I have to start rotating my hand to reach the higher frets, and can't play normal chord shapes anymore. These scoop cutaways give you a straighter line to reach for the high frets, but you still have to rotate your hand.


My thoughts exactly. They do look cool tho.


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 Post subject: Re: Little seen cutaway
PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 7:47 pm 
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I've not had the opportunity to play a guitar with one of those but I agree that they look pretty cool. The one Alan showed above is very slick. That bevel on the Taylor cutaway looks like it's more for appearance than added function. It might increase access to frets 18-20 on what is a pretty standard cutaway by a smidgen at best. It does look nice though. I'm more impressed by the very tight bend of the side at the tip of the cutaway on that guitar.


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 Post subject: Re: Little seen cutaway
PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 12:46 pm 
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Thanks all

Alan - great solution to the look and beautifully done

Ed


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 Post subject: Re: Little seen cutaway
PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 8:52 pm 
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No money above the fifth fret.


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These users thanked the author rlrhett for the post: Michaeldc (Sun Oct 07, 2018 9:00 pm)
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 Post subject: Re: Little seen cutaway
PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2018 1:00 pm 
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I've never liked how those things look (as well as arm bevels) and have never played one. Seems like a marginal Advantage albeit an impressive engineering feat. Interesting idea as ukulele strumming clearance though!

Don't be confused by the shiney new username, it's just good'ol Pat Macaluso!


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 Post subject: Re: Little seen cutaway
PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2018 7:42 am 
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A lot of folks object that a regular cutaway reduces the air volume in the box. It's hard to say what effect that has on the sound, but it probably does something: I suspect that it's more a matter of introducing asymmetry than anything else. A bevel should have a smaller effect, since it takes up less air volume in any case. Classical players, who use a technique that facilitates high fret access without a cutaway, find the bevel cut to be helpful and no more intrusive than necessary. As with most things, it's not for everybody.



These users thanked the author Alan Carruth for the post: Pmaj7 (Tue Oct 09, 2018 2:38 pm)
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 Post subject: Re: Little seen cutaway
PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2018 12:19 pm 
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I had a cutaway classical played at the GAL by a professional guitarist. He looked lost every time he played up the neck past the 12th fret. So maybe the bevel is the better solution if one is needed at all.

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These users thanked the author johnparchem for the post: Pmaj7 (Tue Oct 09, 2018 2:39 pm)
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