Official Luthiers Forum!

Solely owned and operated by Lance Kragenbrink
It is currently Mon Sep 21, 2020 12:23 am


All times are UTC - 5 hours





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2007 10:45 am 
Offline
Walnut
Walnut

Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2007 5:52 pm
Posts: 26
I am about to order a chisel for shaping braces. My thought was to go with
a 1/2" width, but I have the option of 4.5" or 7" length. I am inexperienced
and about to build my first guitar starting in January, so what length do you
think would be best?

Thanks,
Mark


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2007 10:52 am 
Offline
Cocobolo
Cocobolo
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2007 2:29 pm
Posts: 156
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
Hey Mark. Is that blade length? Probably. I really like long paring chisels
for shaping braces. Ground to a shallow (20 degree) angle. More control.
Either will work. Hope that helps. Others will chime in.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2007 10:55 am 
Offline
Koa
Koa

Joined: Sat Aug 04, 2007 10:37 am
Posts: 590
Location: United States
First name: Michael
Last Name: Shaw
City: Phila
State: PA
Zip/Postal Code: 19125
Country: United States
I would go with the longer.

_________________
Guitars, guitars and more guitars.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2007 11:39 am 
Offline
Koa
Koa

Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 1:22 pm
Posts: 766

I have always used long paring chisels untill recently ordering a set of Blue Spruce dovetail chisels. Usually I would not have ordered dovetail length but since they were the only length option at the time I decided to give them a go. I was really supprised by the quality and feel of these chisels, the shorter length give excellent control for fine detail. I guess its more about the quality and balance of the chisel than the length itself.


Sweedish Berg chisels are a great buy second hand of ebay. Half way between a traditional dovetail set and paring chisels and excellent quality.


I would strongly reccomend buying just one or two best quality chisels than many of lesser quality. You will save money long term. Plus, If you chose Berg, Lie Nielsen or Blue Spruce you would not have any trouble selling them if you didnt like the size or style.


 



Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2007 12:14 pm 
Offline
Walnut
Walnut

Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2007 5:52 pm
Posts: 26
Thanks for the responses.
Tommy, sorry for not being clear. The 4.5" or 7" is the length from the front
of the ferrule.
Todd, thanks for the link to the video. I will have to check that out.
Tony, how long are your blue spruce chisels? That is the one I am looking
at.
Thanks again, everyone.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2007 12:18 pm 
Offline
Contributing Member
Contributing Member

Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2005 7:46 am
Posts: 1315
Location: Branson, MO
First name: stan
Last Name: thomison
City: branson
State: mo
Zip/Postal Code: 65616
Country: united states
Focus: Build
Status: Professional
there is also for lack of better word the curved brace chisel from stew mac. works great, and after few years or whatever is great for glue


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2007 12:19 pm 
Offline
Brazilian Rosewood
Brazilian Rosewood

Joined: Fri Nov 03, 2006 6:50 pm
Posts: 2711
Location: Victoria, BC
First name: John
Last Name: Abercrombie
Status: Amateur
Tony's advice about a few good chisels (instead of a 'set') is 'right on the money'.
I like longer blades for most chisel work.
A #3 straight gouge can be useful for shaping braces- carving tools usually have 'rounded bevels' -if that makes any sense- and can make scalloping a bit easier.

Lots of practice on scrap (and sharpening) will pay off- get in the habit of working 'bevel-down' when needed. You really don't need this:



if you know how to handle a regular chisel.

Cheers
John


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2007 12:37 pm 
Offline
Koa
Koa

Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 1:22 pm
Posts: 766

Hi Mark,


The Blue Spruce chisel lengths are 3-5/8, 3-7/8, 4-1/8, and 4-3/8 inches respectively, for the 1/8" to 1/2" for the standard dovetail set.


As I said before, after many years of using paring chisels, I now only use these Blue Spruce chisels. They are thin bladed and expertly crafted.


If you are making your first guitar I would probably get just one or two, maybe a 1/8" and 1/2" or 3/16" and 5/8". The larger for most general work and the smaller for fitting the nut or inlays etc.


These are the best chisels I know of, but there are many other good options to cut spruce and hardwoods! The reason I reccomend top of the line tools to both newbies and experienced woodworkers is; I just feel the better tool one owns, the easier and more enjoyable it becomes to do the work asked of the tool...


 


 



Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2007 12:45 pm 
Offline
Old Growth Brazilian Rosewood
Old Growth Brazilian Rosewood
User avatar

Joined: Fri Nov 02, 2007 9:49 am
Posts: 10661
Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan
First name: Hesh
Last Name: Breakstone
City: Tecumseh and Ann Arbor
State: Michigan
Country: United States
Status: Professional
I like longer paring chisels as well and my favorite to date is the LMI chisel.  I also want to pick up a Blue Spruce chisel based on Tony's excellent recommendation.






_________________
Ann Arbor Guitars
World-Class Repair and Restoration
http://www.annarborguitars.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2007 1:13 pm 
Offline
Brazilian Rosewood
Brazilian Rosewood
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 3:15 pm
Posts: 2302
Location: Florida
I will add another vote for the longer chisel for carving braces. There are very few times when I could use a short chisel and most occasions call for a long one.

_________________
Reguards,

Ken H


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2007 1:22 pm 
Offline
Brazilian Rosewood
Brazilian Rosewood
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 02, 2006 9:02 am
Posts: 2349
Location: Canada
First name: Bob
Last Name: Garrish
City: Toronto
State: Ontario
Country: Canada
Status: Professional
I prefer my Sorby paring chisels to any others I've used. They take a really good edge, and I like the control of a longer blade. They're pricey if you were to buy a whole set of them, but I only have a 1/4" and a 1" and they handle everything I've needed them for. If I were going whole hog I'd probably round that out with a 1/2" and something just under 1/4"

Having had no real training in woodworking, I've always used chisels both bevel up and bevel down for different purposes. I find bevel down especially handy if you're worried about the chisel 'digging in' to your work.

_________________
Bob Garrish
Former Canonized Purveyor of Fine CNC Luthier Services


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 30, 2007 1:17 am 
Offline
Brazilian Rosewood
Brazilian Rosewood

Joined: Wed Jan 05, 2005 6:25 pm
Posts: 2743
Location: Netherlands
I prefer the control the longer blades provide; anchor with the left hand, operate the cut with the right (on the handle). More fine control due to the fact the same amount of swing translates to a smaller change angle.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 17 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
phpBB customization services by 2by2host.com