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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2006 10:30 am 
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Cocobolo
Cocobolo

Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2006 4:17 am
Posts: 338
Location: United States
I use a #6 stanley, I guess really a "jack plane" but at 18" it is a bit lighter then the "7 and does a great job. I got it off E-bay for about $30. An hour of tuning and it makes a great shaving, .0015" thick. Even the original blade was fine once I worked it, but I did replace it with a Hock.   If you get one of e-bay, just remember to get a plane without the original decals and the perfect box, those cost hundreds, the users are common. Stay out of a bidding war and you can get a great plane cheap.   I got a #4 for $25 that is in great condition also. Both of mine are 95+% japaning and no cracks in the totes..
Mikemikev38852.8130208333


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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2006 11:23 am 
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Koa
Koa

Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2006 10:40 am
Posts: 1286
Location: United States
Hesh, call me cheap, I have a 10" and 14" Smoothing planes along with a 6 7/8" block plane. I have used the 10" & 6 7/8" for joining sides. I got mine from Grizzley and tuned them up and keep them sharp. I hit it a few times get me some good consistent curls all the way down and then go to my 2' level with sandpaper on one edge and finish. Seems to work quick and fast for me. I think the highest priced one I bought was around $35.00 FYI.

Mike
White Oak, Texas


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2006 11:24 am 
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Koa
Koa

Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2006 10:21 pm
Posts: 1055
Location: Australia
Was using a number 4 Veritas smoother but have just bought myself a
Veritas jointer.

The No 4 works ok but major problem with a shorter plane is watching
where you put pressure on the sole at start and end of cut. Pressure on
front of plane at start of cut and then move pressure to back of plane by
end of the cut.

Cheers Martinkiwigeo38852.8516898148


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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2006 2:15 pm 
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Cocobolo
Cocobolo

Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2006 10:41 am
Posts: 290
Location: United States
A low angle plane like that will be slightly less versatile than one with a
normal pitch. I'm thinking it would be great for end grain and possibly
for smoothing "stringy" woods like spruce, but I think you'd have quite a
time smoothing hardwoods, especially figured ones.

It might work OK for joining plates, but wouldn't be my first choice. For
one thing, it's a bit short. A longer plane will, theoretically and in my
experience, give you a truer edge. The only disadvantage I see to a larger
plane is that it is bulkier and perhaps more awkward to shoot than a
smaller plane; that's why I use a #5 instead of a #6 or #7.

If the Veritas line has your eye, I suggest you consider either the #6 or
possibly the low-angle jack (#5) with the 50 degree bevel iron.

My $0.02.ecklesweb38852.9701388889


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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2006 2:56 pm 
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Brazilian Rosewood
Brazilian Rosewood
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Joined: Fri Jun 10, 2005 9:51 am
Posts: 2143
Location: San Diego, CA
First name: Andy
Last Name: Zimmerman
City: San Diego
State: CA
Zip/Postal Code: 92103
Country: United States
Focus: Build
A related question
Sometimes when I use my #5 I dont get a perfect joint.
There is a slight gap in the middle of the plates. (Too much removed in the
middle)
I am assuming operator error since I am still a newbie in this regard.
Is this just a matter of pressure.
The #5 should be long enough
Any advice appreciated.

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Andy Z.
http://www.lazydogguitars.com


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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2006 5:13 pm 
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Brazilian Rosewood
Brazilian Rosewood

Joined: Wed Jan 05, 2005 6:25 pm
Posts: 2743
Location: Netherlands
Hesh: the beauty of those planes is that you can get a couple of irons for them; switch from low angle to york pitch in just seconds, simply by swapping out the blades. But yes, I'd get the longer one (the Jack).

Andy: user error, methinks. I've found it's about the pressure you put on the blade when making the cut, any variation at different spots can cause slight high/low spots. You're probably bearing down a little in the middle, for whatever reason.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2006 5:31 pm 
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Koa
Koa

Joined: Wed Jan 05, 2005 10:43 pm
Posts: 1117
Location: Australia
First name: Paul
Last Name: Burns
City: Forster
State: NSW
Zip/Postal Code: 2428
Country: Australia
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
Yeah Andy, what Mattia said.

I had the same problem. It really pays to watch what your body is doing, not whats happening to the material you're working. You need to ask yourself are you shifting your weight mid stroke? Are you changing pressure from one hand to the other? Weight from one foot to the other? Look at it the same way you analyse your golf stroke - you're a doctor so I guess you play golf PaulB38853.1058680556


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2006 6:50 pm 
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Koa
Koa

Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2006 10:21 pm
Posts: 1055
Location: Australia
[QUOTE=ecklesweb] A low angle plane like that will be slightly less
versatile than one with a
normal pitch. I'm thinking it would be great for end grain and possibly
for smoothing "stringy" woods like spruce, but I think you'd have quite a
time smoothing hardwoods, especially figured ones.

[/QUOTE]

I use one of these but have to agree that it doesnt get as much use as I
thought it would when I bought. On spruce its ok going with the runout
but try and plane against runout with a low angle plane and it will tear out
big time. Have had the same experience with rosewood and mahogany.



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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2006 7:35 pm 
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Brazilian Rosewood
Brazilian Rosewood
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Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2005 7:29 am
Posts: 3840
Location: England
For jointing I usually use a #5. I only use elderly Record or Stanley planes and buy them from eBay or markets at ludicrously low prices. I had 2 lie Nielson planes but sold them as they performed only just about as well as the old planes, certainly no better. I have joined boards with a #4 but prefer the extra length of the #5. If you only have one proper plane on your shelf find an old Record #5 with the original Tungsten steel blade and you will die a happy man, and you can buy wood with the money you save from not buying LN.

Colin

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I don't believe in anything, I simply make use of a set of reasonable working hypotheses.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2006 7:56 pm 
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Contributing Member
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Joined: Fri Aug 26, 2005 5:49 pm
Posts: 2907
Location: Norway
[QUOTE=Hesh1956]
Pat I can relate - I know nothing about planes and need to learn.

Since I know nothing here I am reluctant to do eBay knowing that I have no clue what I am looking at..... If I have to tune or restore it's not a good bet for me.

With this said can someone point me to a nice, friendly web site that sells something new that would work well for me and does not cost hundreds of dollars?
[/QUOTE]

Hesh, I'm not trying to sound like a "know-it-all" when it comes to hand planes, but I really think it makes sense to buy a nice, used older plane and learn how to tune it yourself, especially if you don't know much about them to begin with. In the process you will learn how it is constructed, and make you aware of how each part needs to be conditioned and positioned in order to work properly. I think it will make you a better plane user to be aware of these things. Remember that the LN planes are modelled after vintage Stanley Bedrock models, the original will perform just as nicely as the copy once set up right, especially if you get a Hock or equivalent high quality replacement iron. (I really don't think this is needed if you are only planning to use it on spruce, the older laminated carbon steel Stanley cutters are more than adequate, world class work has been performed with them for a long time).

I have a couple of Anant planes too, they are not even close to the vintage Stanleys in my opinion. The casings are rougher, mating between the frog and sole imprecise (Bailey style, inferior to the Bedrock style, again in my opinion), weaker and sloppier adjustment mechanism, rougher tote and knob... It will be a lot more work to tune this plane to perfection. Get a Stanley "worker" condition specimen from WWI era or so, they are common as dirt and inexpensive, perform really well and like I said before have a lot of SOUL!

I think of tuning a plane almost like tuning an instrument; it does not matter if it is perfectly tuned out of the box, you will have to maintain it constantly in order for it to work it's best anyways, why not learn right away?   It is not hard and it IS rewarding!

_________________
Rian Gitar og Mandolin


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2006 11:36 pm 
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Brazilian Rosewood
Brazilian Rosewood

Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2005 6:16 am
Posts: 2244
Location: United States
First name: michael
Last Name: mcclain
City: pendleton
State: sc
Zip/Postal Code: 29670
Status: Professional
i can only but agree with those who recommend the second hand market as the best source for planes. my entire collection of some 13 planes all came from auctions, garage sales, flea markets, etc. the work to tune them is simple, and can become cathartic, even meditative.

as to the best choice for jointing plates, my favourite is the no. 5. a 6 or 7 is too heavy and cumbersome for my liking and their greater length is unnecessary to joint stock the length of tops and backs.       


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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2006 1:01 am 
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Brazilian Rosewood
Brazilian Rosewood
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Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2005 10:11 am
Posts: 2761
Location: Tampa Bay
First name: Dave
Last Name: Anderson
City: Clearwater
State: Florida
Zip/Postal Code: 33755
Country: United States
What Arnt said! Very good advice indeed!

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Anderson Guitars
Clearwater,Fl. 33755


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