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 Post subject: Delightful Curves
PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2012 10:41 pm 
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Koa
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That attached shows what I would consider to be a near perfect curve judging by the analysis graph.
I didn't develop the curve but would like to know what tools are normally used to do so in Rhino.
I've tried some of them such as Fit, Fair etc which refine the curve.
Can one of you Rhino Gurus help me on this?


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 Post subject: Re: Delightful Curves
PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2012 6:16 pm 
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Brazilian Rosewood
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My first stop is always rebuild. Sometimes I use fit and then rebuild, to even out the point distribution, but the end goal for me is always using the minimal number of control points required.

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 Post subject: Re: Delightful Curves
PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2012 11:35 am 
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Koa
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Thanks, Bob.
I'm a newbie at Rhino as I've retired from my day job after using ProE and Autocad for many years.
Still have Autocad (2D only) but certainly can't afford ProE.
Probably would be easier to learn Rhino without knowledge of Proe but I suppose some of the 3D concepts are the same.
Nelson


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 Post subject: Re: Delightful Curves
PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2012 5:49 pm 
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Koa
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Question for you guys.
I'm wondering, since I've become spoiled by the parametric modeling in ProE, whether it will be difficult to get used to Rhino's non-parametric modeling.
I like what I've seen of Rhino so far especially the ease of surfacing.
Any thoughts from those who have used parametric modeling software and then gone back to non?
Thanks
Nelson


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 Post subject: Re: Delightful Curves
PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2012 8:00 pm 
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Koa
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Joined: Tue Jul 04, 2006 3:24 am
Posts: 742
Location: United States
npalen wrote:
Question for you guys.
I'm wondering, since I've become spoiled by the parametric modeling in ProE, whether it will be difficult to get used to Rhino's non-parametric modeling.
I like what I've seen of Rhino so far especially the ease of surfacing.
Any thoughts from those who have used parametric modeling software and then gone back to non?
Thanks
Nelson


Nelson...welcome to fun! A few years back I started messing with Rhino and found it extremely frustrating. The ability to make organtic shapes with Rhino is very good BUT the lack of parametric modeling to me was extremely difficult to get used too. So much of what I use 3D cad (Solidworks) is to solve a problem and parametrics allows this. I am fortunate to have Solidworks through my day job or I am not sure what I would do. I know many have mentioned that Alibre is very similar to Solidworks at a fraction of the cost.

Good luck and let us know what you come up with.

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 Post subject: Re: Delightful Curves
PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2012 11:23 am 
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Koa
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Location: Crownsville, MD
First name: Trevor
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Zip/Postal Code: 21032
Country: USA
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Status: Semi-pro
I use Solidworks at my day job and Rhino at home. If you are doing engineering or design for a living then SW is by far the better tool (even for surfacing in my opinion). But, if you just need a very capable tool to draw geometry in order to actually make parts...then Rhino is an awesome value. Some things do take a bit longer since this is not parametric software, but if you only draw something once it really doesn't make much of a difference IMO. Rhino is actually better than SW in some regards ~ ever try to open up a huge point cloud in SW?

Trev

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 Post subject: Re: Delightful Curves
PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2012 10:39 am 
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Koa
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First name: Nelson
Last Name: Palen
Thanks for your feedback, gentlemen!


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