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 Post subject: X-Carve thoughts
PostPosted: Tue Aug 25, 2015 2:57 pm 
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Mahogany
Mahogany

Joined: Sun May 11, 2014 7:57 pm
Posts: 52
First name: Jimmy
Last Name: Wardle
Does anyone have any thoughts on the X-Carve? I'm just looking to rough acoustic braces, rough out fender style necks, pick guards etc.


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 Post subject: Re: X-Carve thoughts
PostPosted: Tue Aug 25, 2015 5:19 pm 
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Brazilian Rosewood
Brazilian Rosewood
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Joined: Tue May 02, 2006 9:02 am
Posts: 2346
Location: Canada
First name: Bob
Last Name: Garrish
City: Halifax
State: Nova Scotia
Country: Canada
Focus: Build
Status: Professional
So long as you set your expectations properly you should be able to (just barely- 65mm of Z) do all those things on that machine. You will have to be -very- patient, though, as that sort of construction is going to need slow feeds and small cutters to do something like a neck so you'll be waiting hours for it to finish one. The Fender style neck was definitely a necessity as any other neck would be too tall for the machine, but Fender necks are designed to be cut from two faces in thin stock.

The price is definitely right, and I like the stuff the Inventables people put out and the community around them.

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Bob Garrish
Former Canonized Purveyor of Fine CNC Luthier Services


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 Post subject: Re: X-Carve thoughts
PostPosted: Sun Dec 27, 2015 11:36 pm 
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Walnut
Walnut

Joined: Sat Feb 08, 2014 9:38 pm
Posts: 8
First name: Nick
Last Name: Dacek
City: Cleveland
State: OH - Ohio
Zip/Postal Code: 44109
Country: United States
Focus: Build
Status: Semi-pro
In my honest opinion? its a toy. Ive thought about trying their quiet DC spindle, but, after building my own 4 axis for 1800$, and being able to rip right through black walnut, oak, and aluminium at insane speeds, yeah, its a toy. My biggest gripe is, its belt driven. Belts stretch and wear out. Not to mention i watched a guy cut a simple body on an XCarve, said it took something like 6 hours. A well engineered machine thats ball or leadscrew could crank out a dozen of these bodies in 6 hours!


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 Post subject: Re: X-Carve thoughts
PostPosted: Fri Dec 02, 2016 9:22 am 
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Contributing Member
Contributing Member

Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2010 2:52 pm
Posts: 204
First name: Rahoul
Last Name: waghmare
City: pune
State: maharashtra
Zip/Postal Code: 411044
Country: india
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
wooow. zeppelin 4 axis for just $1800?
how u built it and can u help me?


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 Post subject: Re: X-Carve thoughts
PostPosted: Sun Dec 18, 2016 6:53 pm 
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Walnut
Walnut

Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2016 6:41 pm
Posts: 1
First name: TW
Last Name: Felty
City: Grand Rapids
State: MI
Zip/Postal Code: 49525
Country: United States
Focus: Build
Status: Professional
I have an IntelliCarve and have to say I wish I hadn't traded a guitar for it. It's ok for decorative corner blocks and or shallow relief carving but not much more then that for me. Plenty of ideas on the internet for DIY's to build a good machine.

TW


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 Post subject: Re: X-Carve thoughts
PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 7:09 pm 
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Walnut
Walnut

Joined: Fri Feb 13, 2015 7:59 pm
Posts: 39
Location: LI NY
First name: Keith
Last Name: Lally
City: Brookhaven
State: NY
Zip/Postal Code: 11719
Country: United States
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
I agree with Bob about not setting expectations too high. Its an entry level hobbyist cnc machine that works well as a learning tool and something to experiment with. I don't see it fitting into a production shop and getting used hard every day. The belts are a weak point as someone mentioned as they get stretched and get dust in the grooves. The small pulley with tiny set screws on the z-axis screw bolt has already let go during a job and the belts have skipped during a cut as well. For me it was an inexpensive way to get started with cnc and has a good community to turn to for assistance. I'm making molds for side bending and want to use it for hogging off much of the waste wood when carving archtop tops and backs. I do worry about a belt slipping and ruining an expensive piece of maple though... Cutting out head plate designs with some of the fine detail bits is also on my list.

So far its doing what I wanted - helping me learn about cnc hardware and software, and reducing some of the grunt work of making molds. I'm not doing this as a business so the length of time it takes to set up and do the cuts is not a problem.

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- Keith
http://krlguitars.com/


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