Official Luthiers Forum!

Solely owned and operated by Lance Kragenbrink
It is currently Sat Nov 18, 2017 6:11 pm


All times are UTC - 5 hours





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 7:31 pm 
Offline
Walnut
Walnut

Joined: Sun Mar 23, 2008 6:47 pm
Posts: 10
Not sure I have posted before but if I have it was a long time ago. I run a one person repair and building workshop in Melbourne South Eastern Australia.

Recently an early 60's Gibson Melody Maker was left with me to repair some neck damage and complete a re-fret - see photos below. The lacquer is in poor condition with quite a deal of crazing. The neck damage is worse than it looks and there is a depression on the right side [photo POV] that to me looks perilously close to the truss rod lurking underneath. I am pretty sure once I start in on making a flat area to glue a fillet of mahogany too, the truss rod will pop out. Pretty obviously quite a deal of the origional finish will be sacrificed to repair it.

Any ideas as to the best way to proceed with this one?

Image

Image

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 9:59 pm 
Offline
Contributing Member
Contributing Member

Joined: Sun Feb 17, 2013 4:58 pm
Posts: 592
First name: Ed
Last Name: Minch
City: Chestertown
State: MD
Zip/Postal Code: 21620
Country: United States
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
What is the problem if a small area of the truss rod slot is exposed. If you make sure not to get any glue in there, it should not make a difference to the patch.

Ed


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 12:37 am 
Offline
Old Growth Brazilian Rosewood
Old Growth Brazilian Rosewood
User avatar

Joined: Fri Nov 02, 2007 9:49 am
Posts: 9827
Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan
First name: Hesh
Last Name: Breakstone
Country: United States
Status: Professional
What Ed said. Not sure that you have any other choice. The necks on Melody Makers as you know are already super thin making exposing the truss rod as you suspected highly likely. Is this a 60's one?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 1:46 am 
Offline
Walnut
Walnut

Joined: Sun Mar 23, 2008 6:47 pm
Posts: 10
yep 1960's


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 5:19 am 
Offline
Old Growth Brazilian Rosewood
Old Growth Brazilian Rosewood
User avatar

Joined: Fri Nov 02, 2007 9:49 am
Posts: 9827
Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan
First name: Hesh
Last Name: Breakstone
Country: United States
Status: Professional
Cool old guitar. If you get a chance perhaps please post more pics? Also do you know what caused the damage on the back of the neck?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 3:13 pm 
Offline
Koa
Koa
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2008 5:08 am
Posts: 1344
Location: Raleigh, NC
First name: Steve
Last Name: Sollod
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
Just to show it, here is my '62... I've had it since 1969. Bought it from a pawn shop for $42 and trade of cheap Japanese strat copy. I has nice tone. A keeper...


You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

_________________
Steve Sollod (pronounced sorta like "Solid")
www.swiftcreekguitars.com



These users thanked the author sdsollod for the post: Hesh (Tue Nov 14, 2017 11:31 pm)
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 6:09 pm 
Offline
Walnut
Walnut

Joined: Sun Mar 23, 2008 6:47 pm
Posts: 10
Hesh wrote:
Cool old guitar. If you get a chance perhaps please post more pics? Also do you know what caused the damage on the back of the neck?


yes I will when the resto job gets underway -

damage? angry wife or GF/BF I'd say been whacked a few times with a lump of wood - surprised that the neck didn't shatter - the timber is heavily impregnated with sweat, hand gunk etc so it has been played extensively after the damage in spite of its near death experience - the frets are flat and nearly down to the board



These users thanked the author old_picker for the post: Hesh (Tue Nov 14, 2017 11:32 pm)
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 6:46 pm 
Offline
Cocobolo
Cocobolo

Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2016 8:54 am
Posts: 155
State: Texas
Country: United States
Focus: Repair
I've done a similar repair on a 60s Japanese weirdo guitar. It wasn't broken to that extent but what I ended up doing was taking a gouge and scooping out a VERY shallow area. Flip the gouge over and cut your fill with the inverted side so it fits well. Use carbon paper to get a good fit, level it, refin, done deal.

In my case I didn't get down to the truss rod, if you did though I would just cut a channel to fit it and then infill it like normal. I don't know if this would affect the truss rod but I'm sure that a more experienced gentlemen can let us know.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
phpBB customization services by 2by2host.com