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 Post subject: Re: Abnormal resonances
PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 2016 3:35 am 
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Walnut
Walnut

Joined: Thu Aug 25, 2016 4:56 pm
Posts: 10
First name: MASSIMO
Last Name: MILAN
City: VICENZA
Zip/Postal Code: 36100
Country: Italy
Status: Amateur
Still now: on re-fretting (that was almost inevitable).
Ill let you know.


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 Post subject: Re: Abnormal resonances
PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 2016 12:46 pm 
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Cocobolo
Cocobolo

Joined: Sun Aug 25, 2013 9:34 am
Posts: 304
Location: Massachusetts
First name: Rob
Last Name: Lak
State: Massachusetts
Country: USA
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
Just for fun, because when I figured it out I laughed out loud...

When I brought my first build home after having the neck leveled and refretted I was so excited to play without the buzz, but when I played I heard this weird resonance, double tones much like described here.

I don't remember how I figured it out, but this was June and it was warm out... so I had ceiling fans running in just about every room. One day I realized that with the fan off it was fine. Never thought about it before but the fan must have been causing air pressure changes in the box as every paddle passed and caused these weird double tones.

A real forehead slap when I realized what it was!


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 Post subject: Re: Abnormal resonances
PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2017 2:55 am 
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Cocobolo
Cocobolo
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Joined: Mon Dec 28, 2015 10:15 pm
Posts: 110
Location: South Bend IN U.S.A.
First name: Bob
Last Name: English
City: South Bend
State: IN
Country: U.S.A.
Focus: Build
Status: Professional
If the fingerboard is flat as a pool table, then that is a problem in itself. It is supposed to be slightly bowed (relieved), as a string does not resonate flat, but in an ark.

Rodger Knox wrote:
It has been resolved on other forums that this is a zip tone, or longitudinal string resonance, and is more a function of the strings than the guitar or technique.


The above is absolute BS, don't believe it: A string always resonates in a longitudinal kinetic wave, that is absolutely normal and well established physics! It can't even support radial waves, so whoever "Resolved" it just got lucky, and cited some faux science.

Since it produces more than one note or harmonic thereof (If I understood correctly), which indicates it is not a natural dominant frequency as in something tuned to a specific note, my best guess is that it is the strings sounding behind the fretted note to the nut, off of any or most frets. That is why they are out of tune too. Once you have a proper relief in the fingerboard instead of a flat one, it will go away. The right relief will also allow for a lower action.

If your luthier insists on a perfectly flat fingerboard, then look for a new luthier who knows better.

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If what you see is what you get, then Stevie Wonder ain't got nothin'!


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 Post subject: Re: Abnormal resonances
PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2017 9:08 am 
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Koa
Koa

Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2009 10:27 pm
Posts: 1874
Location: South Carolina
First name: John
Last Name: Cox
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
The devil of improperly crowned frets. If this has gone on over several fret changes - maybe you need to try another luthier who knows how to properly level and recrown frets.


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