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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2017 6:27 pm 
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First name: Ed
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I have decided on TruOil for a finish. I have used it once before and liked the result - especially when compared to degree of difficulty. In addition, it is varnish, so has a higher level of durability.

1) MLW just replaced a batch of kitchen towels and they were fine cotton, much like cheesecloth. They make a difference in the application, and now I have a lifetime supply. This is the third coat.

2) I have never done any woodworking quite like these basket weave grilles. I am trying everything to dress them up - chisels, dovetail corner chisels, carving chisels, and triangular files


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 9:21 am 
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That is looking great Ed.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 3:26 pm 
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I just saw this thread for the first time. I like the look of your guitar a lot. The ash looks great and I'm a fan of tortoise binding especially against light woods. I really like the rosette around the cover plate and that purfling overall. Carving the basket weave grills is a cool idea. Building a resonator has been rolling around in the back of my mind for a while and your's gives me more inspiration to do it. I'm looking forward to seeing and hearing it when it's done.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 10:42 am 
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That finish is coming along very well. I do like the basket weave covers. That's a nice touch.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 8:50 pm 
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That looks beautiful. Love the blond finish!


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 17, 2017 6:42 pm 
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First name: Ed
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One last woodworking job - my geometry was off a bit so I need to make a wedge to fit under the fretboard extension. My daughter uses double stick tape on a piece of plexiglass and then attacks it with her belt sander, but I found a method on this forum that appears to give better control for an amateur.

1) You can see the gap

2) measure the gap at .115

3) made a jig that has a spacer 2X as tall as the gap and 2X as far from the far edge as the length of the wedge. In this case, the wedge is 5" long and the spacer is 10" away from the far edge. Stuck the wedge blank and the space down with carpet tape. I also subtracted .020 from the gap to allow for a little fall-off on the extension. so the spacer was .115 less .020 equals .095, then times 2 equals .190.

4) I use a plane long enough to span between the space and the edge - this is my 1947 Stanley #7 at 22" long. It is the only year that the wood was black and it is usually all beat up and minus the paint. This Black Beauty is so much fun to use. The jig has a 1X3 screwed on the bottom so it fits in my vice.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 17, 2017 6:47 pm 
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1) Planing is a go/no-go affair, can't make a mistake. A minute later, the wedge is almost done

2) Fits pretty good right off the jig. There is the .020 gap I was going for - actually .019. Needs a little width trim.

3) When it is glued down it will look fine


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 17, 2017 8:27 pm 
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That's the way I make wedges too Ed. Works good.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2017 1:41 pm 
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1) I did 4 wipe on coats of Tru-Oil, then a 400 grit wet sanding, another 4 and another 400 grit sanding, then 2 more and wet sanding with 1200, 4000, 6000, and 8000 sanding screens, then a couple of different polishes

2) Not a mirror finish, but just what I am after

3) A couple of applications of Mineral Oil on the fretboard


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2017 1:45 pm 
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First name: Ed
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1) Here is my label - "Ash from Big Bend Mountain, Talcott, WV", with a picture of the tunnel that John Henry worked in

2) Titebond and fish glues work well for gluing down a label. Knox Gelatin does a great job. But it is the perfect use for outdated Old Brown Glue

3) Just need to complete the headstock and install the fretboard wedge and I am done - can't wait to string it up


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2017 4:49 pm 
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That is just too cool. I am for sure going to have to build a resonator at some point!

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2017 11:50 pm 
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I completely agree on both points. Can't wait to hear what it sounds like.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2017 9:53 am 
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1. Looks absolutely great, can't wait to hear it! I definitely want to build a resonator one day.

2. On wet sanding the finish -- do you use water for that? I've wet sanded cars, but never thought of doing that on wood.

3. Great idea for the taper jig, I'll be filing that away for use shortly as I expect to have the same situation on my project.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2017 7:03 pm 
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Thanks all - I measure my woodworking projects by how many time they make me laugh during construction. This one is right up there.

Joe - definitely you can use water as a lubricant. I put a drop of Dawn in it and I have used the same small pieces of sanding screen for 6 instruments now. Using Tru-Oil, one method is to use the Tru-Oil as a lubricant - 400 grit, wipe it off and let it dry, then finer and finer the same way. This can help to fill. I personally don't feel I have to fill grain completely and am fine with the way it looks.

The taper jig is great - even I can't amke a mistake

Ed


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2017 5:27 pm 
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I picked out a National Resonator headstock shape. Here are a couple of the ways they treated it:

1) just s simple white binding to match the fretboard

2) a beautiful ivoroid version with an inked impression - I have looked into this and the tooling for the impression is very expensive for one instrument. I love this one

3) Here is tortoise that would match my binding.

I picked one I will show you in a minute


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2017 5:31 pm 
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I have decided to have a decal made of very very thin vinyl.

1) Flip the head face-down and make a very accurate tracing of the shape

2) Now my sign guy enters the tracing into the computer, and makes a strip around the outside that is 1/16" wide and 1/16" in from the edge - that's it on the left. On the right is the actual logo with my changes

3) With the outside stripe installed - very crisp


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2017 5:33 pm 
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Here is how they are installed;

1) Now for the logo - tape it in the right location, including a piece of tape right across the middle dividing into top and bottom

2) Lift the bottom half to the tape and cut off the backing exposing the adhesive side, then stick that half down

3) Now lift the top half, remove the backing, and stick the top half down


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2017 5:35 pm 
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1) I use a squeegee to press the material down for a good bond. Then I peel off the face that has a very light adhesive on it that holds all the parts in position. Last is a couple coats of finish to help hold it in place

2) I left the center out of 2 of the letters to mimic the original. How did I do?


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 8:05 am 
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That looks great Ed!

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 11:57 am 
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What Steve said! Looks like a pro job!

Alex

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 5:06 pm 
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Down to the wire

On a regular acoustic guitar, the last thing you do is position the bridge/saddle for compensation and glue it on. On a resonator, you locate the cone/saddle early on, and glue the fretboard on the neck in position for compensation.

1) Now at the end, 2 strings on - with my measured stick, I position the saddle then spin the cone a touch to compensate the saddle

2) I deepen the nut slots carefully - I still use a feeler gauge under the string on the first fret, so it takes a while, but it turns out just right

3) Remove the nut and take down the excess height so about 1/2 of each string is exposed above it,then shape and polish


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 5:11 pm 
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So here it is. I don't have another resonator to compare its sound to, but a week from today I will get my daughter to play it for a video.


3) Kluson tuners. I left the worm holes - about 8 of them - in honor of the insects that were tunneling in the wood


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 5:16 pm 
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I am getting better at neck joints


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 5:24 pm 
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1) and 2) The fretboard binding is cut off from the top and back pieces. There is another worm hole on the heel

This has been a great experience. The whole thing is made from the same log, plus some 30 year old walnut for the head the fretboard. Resonators aren't difficult - just different, and this one sounds very sweet (but loud) to me. I'll post a video. I'll see if I can conjure the spirit of John Henry

So I managed to follow the rules:

Something Old: the fretboard and head veneer are a piece of Walnut that has been in my shop for about 30 years.

Something New: 1) A resonator, 2) A guitar made entirely from the same log, 3) a rosette around the cover plate, which I have never seen before, 4) carved wooden grills, which I have never seen before, 5) using cross-grained slices of the back for fretboard binding, which I have never seen before, 6) carving my first neck, complete with Martin volute. Do I get extra points for 6 new things??

Something Local: The Ash from my friend's farm, the Walnut from another friend's New Jersey farm in the 80's

Pick 2: A parlor guitar (13-3/4") under the cost limit ($272, but if you subtract the metal parts, $0)


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2017 12:13 am 
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That's sweet. I love it. So many cool features. I think it's really cool that you made it from wood you salvaged. You don't often see that...

I am looking forward to hear it play!


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