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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 1:09 am 
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Koa
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I am making an ebony binding with a couple different layers of veneer and am wondering what glues work best for this job. I thought I heard somewhere that you shouldn't use titebond because it is waterbase and may fail when bending the binding. Any recommendations?

Thanks!

John


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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 1:10 am 
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I use Titebond III, the new stuff. It survives the heat from the bending just
fine.

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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 1:23 am 
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I use Titebond II or III . Both work fine.

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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 1:28 am 
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Koa
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I've got a bottle of the III but have not tried it. I believe someone said it wasn't that good that II was better.

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"If it doesn't play in tune...it's just pretty wood"


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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 3:57 am 
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John, for bindings that are already made, which need purfling applied after the fact, I have been using superglue to great effect. It's a bit tedious to apply, but not impossible. I brush accelerator onto the binding, place the purfling and binding together in the Stew-Mac binding laminator, and start applying the water thin glue. The glue will set almost as fast as you can pull it through the jig.

Super glue really holds up to the abuse of heat and pressure. But the fumes coming off the bender can irritate.

Steve

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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 3:58 am 
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Dave -
II is junk for guitars. Use regular Titebond I for most everything. Titebond
III for when heat is an issue (bindings).

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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 5:30 am 
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Koa
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[QUOTE=Sylvan] Dave -
II is junk for guitars. Use regular Titebond I for most everything. Titebond
III for when heat is an issue (bindings).[/QUOTE]

Thanks for the follow up Sylvan...I checked ( my big bottle) it is just plain original tite-bond wood glue. I guess it was the II that I remember someone saying N.G. THANKS!!!!

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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 7:19 am 
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Cocobolo
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By the way, you don't necessarily need to have the side purflings glued to the binding when bending. The purfling lines (made from strips of veneer stock) can be bent seperately by taping tightly between two pieces of scrap to hold them on edge during the bend.

I had to do that when once my colored veneer totally faded to a nauseating color during the bend. I had to split the faded side purfling lines off the ebony binding, bend some new purfling seperately (and at lower temperature), and install it under the binding at the same time the binding was glued in using the Fox "dry" method. No problem at all by the way, the purfling lines bent perfectly, and installed as separate pieces with no fuss at all!


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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 7:20 am 
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[QUOTE=Steve Kinnaird] John, for bindings that are already made, which need purfling applied after the fact, I have been using superglue to great effect. It's a bit tedious to apply, but not impossible. I brush accelerator onto the binding, place the purfling and binding together in the Stew-Mac binding laminator, and start applying the water thin glue. The glue will set almost as fast as you can pull it through the jig.

Super glue really holds up to the abuse of heat and pressure. But the fumes coming off the bender can irritate.

Steve[/QUOTE]

Steve, are you using this jig to laminate side purfling to wood binding? Stewmac's info. indicates it's designed for plastic binding. If this will work on wood, it will be a solution to one of my least favorite tasks.

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